Joseph Grigely
(above image: The Conversation Was Going Well Without Me, 2007 Ink and pencil on paper, 57 x 44 inches)

8 Pink Conversations, 2000 Ink and graphite on paper, pins, 11 1/4 x 20 1/2 inches
Joseph Grigely suffered a childhood accident leaving him deaf. His work is centered around how his way of interacting and living in this world leaves him with clues or pathways through the memories of the day. Grigely archives and displays the messages written to and from him gathered throughout a typical day in his life. 
The second photo, due to its monochromatic pastel hue and school supply-esque aspects, harkens to me childhood note passing. However, the way the dark hues are broken up with the lighter hues feels more aesthetically intentional and therefore more mature. Also, the peculiarity of this piece’s monochromatic look asks questions of performative nature. Did he only use pink cards on purpose? Did he only include ones that were pink? In any regard it is clear that these cards tell a story. This idea leads me to again think back to the childish feel of this piece as I think about the idea of “story time” within elementary education. Perhaps Grigley is referencing the trauma of his childhood and his accident.
Although my project deals with an aid to the hearing-impaired, I feel as if this series differs greatly. Grigley’s series is highly personal, whereas mine is meant to be highly impersonal almost as if I am acting as the machine/software that is creating the material I appropriate. I do feel like I can learn a lot from his other work as well:

Grigley’s Songs Without Words, 2008
This series has the same spontaneous and dynamically moving feel of my Internet screen captures. I feel as if Grigley is approaching an interesting way to not only appropriative work but also portraiture, something I had not yet considered in my most recent similar work. 
— Jenny Kljucaric

Joseph Grigely

(above image: The Conversation Was Going Well Without Me, 2007
Ink and pencil on paper, 57 x 44 inches)

8 Pink Conversations, 2000
Ink and graphite on paper, pins, 11 1/4 x 20 1/2 inches

Joseph Grigely suffered a childhood accident leaving him deaf. His work is centered around how his way of interacting and living in this world leaves him with clues or pathways through the memories of the day. Grigely archives and displays the messages written to and from him gathered throughout a typical day in his life.


The second photo, due to its monochromatic pastel hue and school supply-esque aspects, harkens to me childhood note passing. However, the way the dark hues are broken up with the lighter hues feels more aesthetically intentional and therefore more mature. Also, the peculiarity of this piece’s monochromatic look asks questions of performative nature. Did he only use pink cards on purpose? Did he only include ones that were pink? In any regard it is clear that these cards tell a story. This idea leads me to again think back to the childish feel of this piece as I think about the idea of “story time” within elementary education. Perhaps Grigley is referencing the trauma of his childhood and his accident.

Although my project deals with an aid to the hearing-impaired, I feel as if this series differs greatly. Grigley’s series is highly personal, whereas mine is meant to be highly impersonal almost as if I am acting as the machine/software that is creating the material I appropriate. I do feel like I can learn a lot from his other work as well:

Grigley’s Songs Without Words, 2008

This series has the same spontaneous and dynamically moving feel of my Internet screen captures. I feel as if Grigley is approaching an interesting way to not only appropriative work but also portraiture, something I had not yet considered in my most recent similar work. 

— Jenny Kljucaric